Nanoscience moves from research lab to start-up
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As a research scientist and co-founder of Veriphy Skincare in Guelph, University of Guelph graduate Carley Miki spends her days testing beauty products. They contain nanoparticles from sweet corn — now trademarked as PhytoSpherix — discovered by physics professor John Dutcher, whose lab Miki worked in as an undergraduate. Cosmetics are just one of the applications for nanoparticles now being explored and marketed by a start-up called Mirexus Biotechnologies, which is based along with Veriphy in a 12,000-square-foot facility in Guelph. Mirexus expects to grow to 72 full-time positions within 10 years. In fall 2018, Veriphy launched a scholarship to encourage young women to pursue studies in science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

To learn more, visit the University of Guelph’s Portico Magazine.

“I was attracted to U of G because of its nanoscience program that meshes aspects of engineering, chemistry and physics. I like working with them all. When you start blending fields, you get some interesting science out of that.”
Carley Miki
Research Scientist and Co-Founder of Veriphy Skincare
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